Ireland Chair of Poetry Trust Opens Call for Submissions to Special Commemorative Anthology

The Ireland Chair of Poetry are delighted to be able to invite submissions to an anthology of original poems, essays and reflections by emerging poets from across the island of Ireland created in response to the work of creative mentors, to celebrate the work of the Ireland Chair of Poetry. This commemorative anthology will be published by UCD Press in late 2020.

The Ireland Chair of Poetry was established in 1998, to commemorate the awarding of the 1995 Nobel Prize for Literature to Seamus Heaney and, more widely, as a way to permanently mark and recognise Ireland’s extraordinary literary achievements. As we approach the 25th anniversary of Heaney’s Nobel Prize win, we look to mark the occasion by honouring the contribution and legacy of writers like Seamus Heaney, the Chairs of Poetry and their peers, among a new generation of poets emerging in the literary landscape.

We wish to recognise this tradition and celebrate the unique and formative relationships that exist between new writers and their creative mentors. We hope, through this anthology, to spark an intergenerational dialogue by bridging established, well-known names in Irish literature with newfound, diverse voices, and illuminate the literary heritage, traditions, themes and resonances unfolding in contemporary Irish poetry.

We invite new/emerging poets to respond to this call by submitting work inspired by a mentor who has had a tangible, direct or indirect, impact on their life, work, imagination, themes, style and/or practice. This can take the form of either:

— an original poem, inspired by one of a mentor’s poems/collections/oeuvre, including a short note (250 words) on why the work/poet that inspired it is particularly meaningful to you; or

— a personal or critical reflection, essay, letter or other form of print media engaging with some aspect of a mentor’s practice, process, creative or critical thought in the form of lectures, talks, archival materials and/or personal interaction or correspondences.

Please refer to the information packet for information on submissions and guidelines.

Submissions

Submissions will be accepted from Wednesday May 6th to Monday July 6th – closes midnight, Irish Standard Time.

Please email your work with a brief covering letter and a short biography (80 words) to: chairofpoetryanthology@gmail.com

Please read the following guidelines carefully:

Submissions should be attached as a Word (.doc or .docx) or PDF file, in standard 12pt font, with numbered pages, and double-spaced in the case of critical essays/reflections.

Please send only one poem or critical essay/reflection per writer.

If submitting an original poem, please make sure to include a short note (250 words) on why the work/poet that inspired it is particularly meaningful to you.

While there are no firm restrictions, the suggested length is no more than 2000 words for all submissions. There is no minimum word count.

An optional equality, diversity and inclusion monitoring form is included at the end of this document, which you may complete and return along with your submission.

Anthology publication is scheduled for late 2020 with UCD Press. Chosen contributors will receive payment. Any further queries may be directed to the email address above.

Guidelines

— We will only consider new, original, previously unpublished work for this anthology.

— For the purposes of this project, new/emerging writers are considered to be those who have published no more than two full-length books/collections at the time of submission. Poets who have no previous publications in online or print literary magazines, journals, anthologies or books are encouraged to apply. Pamphlet-length booklets do not count as book-length collections; poets can have published multiple pamphlets and/or have work featured in various anthologies, and still be eligible.

— We regret that we are not in a position to request permissions for reproductions of extensive quotations from copyright material. We recommend adhering to fair use guidelines for poetry (three to four lines or no more than a quarter of the full poem), unless the cited work is in the public domain due to expiration of the copyright term (for authors, this is their lifetime plus 70 years) or in the case that the work pre-dates any international copyright protection legislation. If in doubt, please email us to confirm.

— Preference will be given to submissions from contributors and including mentors who have roots in, live/work in, or can demonstrate a strong connection to, the Republic of Ireland and/or Northern Ireland.

— It is not necessary to have had a personal or direct relationship or contact with a mentor, as long as you can demonstrate a deep and sustained engagement with their work and that it has had a significant impact on your own development and practice.

— Of particular, but not exclusive, interest to the editors is the role and/or influence that the previous and current Chair/s have had on the work of emerging writers. Poets who have previously held the position of the Ireland Chair of Poetry include John Montague, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, Paul Durcan, Michael Longley, Harry Clifton, Paula Meehan, and Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin. The current Ireland Chair of Poetry is Frank Ormsby.

— We recognise that not all mentors need necessarily be writers, therefore we will also consider the inclusion of mentors who are active in fields other than literature.

— We are eager to hear from a range of voices and experiences, and we particularly welcome submissions from writers who are under-represented in Irish literature, including those protected under the Nine Grounds of Equal Status laid out by the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission on the basis of gender, civil status, family status, sexual orientation, religion, age, disability, race, and membership of the Traveller community; as well as writers from diverse socio-economic backgrounds. Our editorial team comprises poets representing different cultural, national, ethnic, gender and sexual identities, and we remain deeply committed to reflecting and championing equality and diversity in the production and reception of this work. To assist this process, we have included an equality, diversity and inclusion monitoring form, which may be completed and returned along with your submission to: chairofpoetryanthology@gmail.com.

This anthology is conceived and edited by the awardees of the inaugural Ireland Chair of Poetry Student Prize 2019: Mícheál McCann, Summer Meline, Marcella L.A. Prince and Nidhi Zak/Aria Eipe, with Ireland Professor of Poetry, Frank Ormsby, serving as Advising Editor. Further information about the editorial team is included below.

Editors

Mícheál McCann is from Derry. His poems appear in Poetry Ireland Review, Banshee Lit and The Tangerine. His work also appears elsewhere: an interview with Mark Doty on the AIDS crisis, elegy and optimism published in PN Review 248; libretto for the Derry International Choral Festival, and in a feature for BBC Radio Foyle. A graduate of the MA in Poetry programme from the Seamus Heaney Centre, he is currently a PhD candidate at Queen’s University Belfast. His research finds itself at the intersections of AIDS writing, queer theory and positive affect. Mícheál is the recipient of a 2019/20 ACES award from the Arts Council of Northern Ireland and 2018 River Mill Bursary. His first pamphlet of poems is forthcoming from Green Bottle Press in 2020.

Summer Meline was born and raised in Northern California. She received her BA in English Literature at University of California, Berkeley, studying with Thom Gunn and Robert Hass. In 1999, she moved to Ireland and established a career in the fintech sector. She has been facilitating the Donaghmede Library Writers’ Group for five years and liaises with the Dublin UNESCO City of Literature office to help promote and expand the creative arts available in public libraries. She is a recent graduate of the MPhil in Creative Writing from Trinity College Dublin.

Marcella L.A. Prince grew up in Wisconsin and completed her undergraduate degree in English at the University of Minnesota – Morris. Her poems appear or are forthcoming in literary magazines including The Tangerine, The Open Ear, and The Lonely Crowd, and have been featured on The Seamus Heaney Centre Podcast. She has read her work at events held at the Belfast Book Festival, Lifeboat Sessions and the London Irish Centre. She is a recent graduate of the MA in Poetry at Queen’s University Belfast, where she is currently continuing her studies as a PhD candidate with a focus on Midwestern-American landscape poetry.

Nidhi Zak/Aria Eipe is a poet, pacifist and fabulist. Her poems are widely published/forthcoming, most recently in Banshee, Poetry Ireland Review, The Irish Times, The Stinging Fly, Winter Papers; featured on RTÉ Radio 1’s The Poetry Programme, Arts Council of Ireland’s Poetry Day film specials, and Poetry Ireland’s Words Lightly Spoken podcast; hosted in the Irish Poetry Reading Archive; and commissioned for the Galway 2020 European Capital of Culture and Rio 2016 Olympic Truce celebrations. She is the recipient of a Next Generation Artist Award 2019/20 from the Arts Council of Ireland, Jaipur Literature Festival’s First Book Club Award 2018, and was highly commended in the Patrick Kavanagh Poetry Awards 2019. She earned an MA in Eastern Classics from St. John’s College and an MFA in Creative Writing from University College Dublin. Her first book of poetry is forthcoming in Autumn 2021.

Advising Editor

Frank Ormsby is the current Ireland Chair of Poetry. His latest collections are The Rain Barrel (Bloodaxe Books, 2019) and The Darkness of Snow (Bloodaxe Books, 2017), a Poetry Book Society Recommendation, which was shortlisted for a National Book Circle Critics Award in the US. He has edited a number of anthologies and other books, including Northern Windows: An Anthology of Ulster Autobiography (1987), Thine in Storm and Calm: An Amanda McKittrick Ros Reader (1988), The Collected Poems of John Hewitt (1991), and The Hip Flask: Short Poems from Ireland (2001), all from Blackstaff Press, and The Blackbird’s Nest (2006), an anthology of poems from Queen’s University, Belfast. Frank was editor of The Honest Ulsterman from 1969 to 1989, and has also edited Poetry Ireland Review. Until 2010, he was Head of English at the Royal Belfast Academical Institution. In 1992 he received the Cultural Traditions Award, given in memory of John Hewitt, and in 2002, the Lawrence O’Shaughnessy Award for Poetry.

The editors remain grateful to the Ireland Chair of Poetry Trust, the Arts Council of Ireland and the Arts Council of Northern Ireland for their generosity and support in making this project possible.

We are delighted to invite submissions to an anthology of original poems, essays and reflections by emerging poets from across the island of Ireland created in response to the work of creative mentors, to celebrate the work of the Ireland Chair of Poetry. This commemorative anthology will be published by UCD Press in late 2020.

The Ireland Chair of Poetry was established in 1998, to commemorate the awarding of the 1995 Nobel Prize for Literature to Seamus Heaney and, more widely, as a way to permanently mark and recognise Ireland’s extraordinary literary achievements. As we approach the 25th anniversary of Heaney’s Nobel Prize win, we look to mark the occasion by honouring the contribution and legacy of writers like Seamus Heaney, the Chairs of Poetry and their peers, among a new generation of poets emerging in the literary landscape.

We wish to recognise this tradition and celebrate the unique and formative relationships that exist between new writers and their creative mentors. We hope, through this anthology, to spark an intergenerational dialogue by bridging established, well-known names in Irish literature with newfound, diverse voices, and illuminate the literary heritage, traditions, themes and resonances unfolding in contemporary Irish poetry.

We invite new/emerging poets to respond to this call by submitting work inspired by a mentor who has had a tangible, direct or indirect, impact on their life, work, imagination, themes, style and/or practice. This can take the form of either:

— an original poem, inspired by one of a mentor’s poems/collections/oeuvre, including a short note (250 words) on why the work/poet that inspired it is particularly meaningful to you; or

— a personal or critical reflection, essay, letter or other form of print media engaging with some aspect of a mentor’s practice, process, creative or critical thought in the form of lectures, talks, archival materials and/or personal interaction or correspondences.

Please refer to the information packet for information on submissions and guidelines.

Submissions

Submissions will be accepted from Wednesday May 6th to Monday July 6th – closes midnight, Irish Standard Time.

Please email your work with a brief covering letter and a short biography (80 words) to: chairofpoetryanthology@gmail.com

Please read the following guidelines carefully:

Submissions should be attached as a Word (.doc or .docx) or PDF file, in standard 12pt font, with numbered pages, and double-spaced in the case of critical essays/reflections.

Please send only one poem or critical essay/reflection per writer.

If submitting an original poem, please make sure to include a short note (250 words) on why the work/poet that inspired it is particularly meaningful to you.

While there are no firm restrictions, the suggested length is no more than 2000 words for all submissions. There is no minimum word count.

An optional equality, diversity and inclusion monitoring form is included at the end of this document, which you may complete and return along with your submission.

Anthology publication is scheduled for late 2020 with UCD Press. Chosen contributors will receive payment. Any further queries may be directed to the email address above.

Guidelines

— We will only consider new, original, previously unpublished work for this anthology.

— For the purposes of this project, new/emerging writers are considered to be those who have published no more than two full-length books/collections at the time of submission. Poets who have no previous publications in online or print literary magazines, journals, anthologies or books are encouraged to apply. Pamphlet-length booklets do not count as book-length collections; poets can have published multiple pamphlets and/or have work featured in various anthologies, and still be eligible.

— We regret that we are not in a position to request permissions for reproductions of extensive quotations from copyright material. We recommend adhering to fair use guidelines for poetry (three to four lines or no more than a quarter of the full poem), unless the cited work is in the public domain due to expiration of the copyright term (for authors, this is their lifetime plus 70 years) or in the case that the work pre-dates any international copyright protection legislation. If in doubt, please email us to confirm.

— Preference will be given to submissions from contributors and including mentors who have roots in, live/work in, or can demonstrate a strong connection to, the Republic of Ireland and/or Northern Ireland.

— It is not necessary to have had a personal or direct relationship or contact with a mentor, as long as you can demonstrate a deep and sustained engagement with their work and that it has had a significant impact on your own development and practice.

— Of particular, but not exclusive, interest to the editors is the role and/or influence that the previous and current Chair/s have had on the work of emerging writers. Poets who have previously held the position of the Ireland Chair of Poetry include John Montague, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, Paul Durcan, Michael Longley, Harry Clifton, Paula Meehan, and Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin. The current Ireland Chair of Poetry is Frank Ormsby.

— We recognise that not all mentors need necessarily be writers, therefore we will also consider the inclusion of mentors who are active in fields other than literature.

— We are eager to hear from a range of voices and experiences, and we particularly welcome submissions from writers who are under-represented in Irish literature, including those protected under the Nine Grounds of Equal Status laid out by the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission on the basis of gender, civil status, family status, sexual orientation, religion, age, disability, race, and membership of the Traveller community; as well as writers from diverse socio-economic backgrounds. Our editorial team comprises poets representing different cultural, national, ethnic, gender and sexual identities, and we remain deeply committed to reflecting and championing equality and diversity in the production and reception of this work. To assist this process, we have included an equality, diversity and inclusion monitoring form, which may be completed and returned along with your submission to: chairofpoetryanthology@gmail.com.

This anthology is conceived and edited by the awardees of the inaugural Ireland Chair of Poetry Student Prize 2019: Mícheál McCann, Summer Meline, Marcella L.A. Prince and Nidhi Zak/Aria Eipe, with Ireland Professor of Poetry, Frank Ormsby, serving as Advising Editor. Further information about the editorial team is included below.

Editors

Mícheál McCann is from Derry. His poems appear in Poetry Ireland Review, Banshee Lit and The Tangerine. His work also appears elsewhere: an interview with Mark Doty on the AIDS crisis, elegy and optimism published in PN Review 248; libretto for the Derry International Choral Festival, and in a feature for BBC Radio Foyle. A graduate of the MA in Poetry programme from the Seamus Heaney Centre, he is currently a PhD candidate at Queen’s University Belfast. His research finds itself at the intersections of AIDS writing, queer theory and positive affect. Mícheál is the recipient of a 2019/20 ACES award from the Arts Council of Northern Ireland and 2018 River Mill Bursary. His first pamphlet of poems is forthcoming from Green Bottle Press in 2020.

Summer Meline was born and raised in Northern California. She received her BA in English Literature at University of California, Berkeley, studying with Thom Gunn and Robert Hass. In 1999, she moved to Ireland and established a career in the fintech sector. She has been facilitating the Donaghmede Library Writers’ Group for five years and liaises with the Dublin UNESCO City of Literature office to help promote and expand the creative arts available in public libraries. She is a recent graduate of the MPhil in Creative Writing from Trinity College Dublin.

Marcella L.A. Prince grew up in Wisconsin and completed her undergraduate degree in English at the University of Minnesota – Morris. Her poems appear or are forthcoming in literary magazines including The Tangerine, The Open Ear, and The Lonely Crowd, and have been featured on The Seamus Heaney Centre Podcast. She has read her work at events held at the Belfast Book Festival, Lifeboat Sessions and the London Irish Centre. She is a recent graduate of the MA in Poetry at Queen’s University Belfast, where she is currently continuing her studies as a PhD candidate with a focus on Midwestern-American landscape poetry.

Nidhi Zak/Aria Eipe is a poet, pacifist and fabulist. Her poems are widely published/forthcoming, most recently in Banshee, Poetry Ireland Review, The Irish Times, The Stinging Fly, Winter Papers; featured on RTÉ Radio 1’s The Poetry Programme, Arts Council of Ireland’s Poetry Day film specials, and Poetry Ireland’s Words Lightly Spoken podcast; hosted in the Irish Poetry Reading Archive; and commissioned for the Galway 2020 European Capital of Culture and Rio 2016 Olympic Truce celebrations. She is the recipient of a Next Generation Artist Award 2019/20 from the Arts Council of Ireland, Jaipur Literature Festival’s First Book Club Award 2018, and was highly commended in the Patrick Kavanagh Poetry Awards 2019. She earned an MA in Eastern Classics from St. John’s College and an MFA in Creative Writing from University College Dublin. Her first book of poetry is forthcoming in Autumn 2021.

Advising Editor

Frank Ormsby is the current Ireland Chair of Poetry. His latest collections are The Rain Barrel (Bloodaxe Books, 2019) and The Darkness of Snow (Bloodaxe Books, 2017), a Poetry Book Society Recommendation, which was shortlisted for a National Book Circle Critics Award in the US. He has edited a number of anthologies and other books, including Northern Windows: An Anthology of Ulster Autobiography (1987), Thine in Storm and Calm: An Amanda McKittrick Ros Reader (1988), The Collected Poems of John Hewitt (1991), and The Hip Flask: Short Poems from Ireland (2001), all from Blackstaff Press, and The Blackbird’s Nest (2006), an anthology of poems from Queen’s University, Belfast. Frank was editor of The Honest Ulsterman from 1969 to 1989, and has also edited Poetry Ireland Review. Until 2010, he was Head of English at the Royal Belfast Academical Institution. In 1992 he received the Cultural Traditions Award, given in memory of John Hewitt, and in 2002, the Lawrence O’Shaughnessy Award for Poetry.

The editors remain grateful to the Ireland Chair of Poetry Trust, the Arts Council of Ireland and the Arts Council of Northern Ireland for their generosity and support in making this project possible.

Edited by the recipients of the 2019 ICOP Student Award — Mícheál McCann, Summer Meline, Marcella L.A. Prince, and Nidhi Zak/Aria Eipe — the anthology aims to commemorate the 25th anniversary of Seamus Heaney’s Nobel Prize win, as well as honour the contribution and legacy of the Chairs of Poetry and their peers, among a new generation of poets. Continuing their fine work, as seen in the Poet’s Chair series, UCD Press will publish the anthology in late 2020.

In an effort to celebrate the unique and formative relationships that exist between new writers and their creative mentors, the editors are hopeful this anthology will spark an intergenerational dialogue by bridging established, well-known names in Irish literature with newfound, diverse voices, and illuminate the literary heritage, traditions, themes and resonances unfolding in contemporary Irish and Northern Irish Poetry.

The editors invite new/emerging poets to respond to this call by submitting work inspired by a mentor who has had a tangible impact on their life, work, imagination, themes, style and/or practice. Submissions may take the form of a single poem or a critical essay/reflection. Please ensure to read the submission guidelines fully before submitting.

The submission and eligibility guidelines are available to download by clicking here.

The submission window is open from Wednesday May 6th and will close at midnight on Monday July 6th.

To submit please email your work with a brief covering letter and a short biography (80 words) to: chairofpoetryanthology@gmail.com 

All queries should be directed to: chairofpoetryanthology@gmail.com

Editors

Mícheál McCann is from Derry. His poems appear in Poetry Ireland Review, Banshee Lit and The Tangerine. His work also appears elsewhere: an interview with Mark Doty on the AIDS crisis, elegy and optimism published in PN Review 248; libretto for the Derry International Choral Festival, and in a feature for BBC Radio Foyle. A graduate of the MA in Poetry programme from the Seamus Heaney Centre, he is currently a PhD candidate at Queen’s University Belfast. His research finds itself at the intersections of AIDS writing, queer theory and positive affect. Mícheál is the recipient of a 2019/20 ACES award from the Arts Council of Northern Ireland and 2018 River Mill Bursary. His first pamphlet of poems is forthcoming from Green Bottle Press in 2020.

Summer Meline was born and raised in Northern California. She received her BA in English Literature at University of California, Berkeley, studying with Thom Gunn and Robert Hass. In 1999, she moved to Ireland and established a career in the fintech sector. She has been facilitating the Donaghmede Library Writers’ Group for five years and liaises with the Dublin UNESCO City of Literature office to help promote and expand the creative arts available in public libraries. She is a recent graduate of the MPhil in Creative Writing from Trinity College Dublin.

Marcella L.A. Prince grew up in Wisconsin and completed her undergraduate degree in English at the University of Minnesota – Morris. Her poems appear or are forthcoming in literary magazines including The Tangerine, The Open Ear, and The Lonely Crowd, and have been featured on The Seamus Heaney Centre Podcast. She has read her work at events held at the Belfast Book Festival, Lifeboat Sessions and the London Irish Centre. She is a recent graduate of the MA in Poetry at Queen’s University Belfast, where she is currently continuing her studies as a PhD candidate with a focus on Midwestern-American landscape poetry.

Nidhi Zak/Aria Eipe is a poet, pacifist and fabulist. Her poems are widely published/forthcoming, most recently in Banshee, Poetry Ireland Review, The Irish Times, The Stinging Fly, Winter Papers; featured on RTÉ Radio 1’s The Poetry Programme, Arts Council of Ireland’s Poetry Day film specials, and Poetry Ireland’s Words Lightly Spoken podcast; hosted in the Irish Poetry Reading Archive; and commissioned for the Galway 2020 European Capital of Culture and Rio 2016 Olympic Truce celebrations. She is the recipient of a Next Generation Artist Award 2019/20 from the Arts Council of Ireland, Jaipur Literature Festival’s First Book Club Award 2018, and was highly commended in the Patrick Kavanagh Poetry Awards 2019. She earned an MA in Eastern Classics from St. John’s College and an MFA in Creative Writing from University College Dublin. Her first book of poetry is forthcoming in Autumn 2021.

Advising Editor

Professor Frank Ormsby is the current Ireland Chair of Poetry. His latest collections are The Rain Barrel (Bloodaxe Books, 2019) and The Darkness of Snow (Bloodaxe Books, 2017), a Poetry Book Society Recommendation, which was shortlisted for a National Book Circle Critics Award in the US. He has edited a number of anthologies and other books, including Northern Windows: An Anthology of Ulster Autobiography (1987), Thine in Storm and Calm: An Amanda McKittrick Ros Reader (1988), The Collected Poems of John Hewitt (1991), and The Hip Flask: Short Poems from Ireland (2001), all from Blackstaff Press, and The Blackbird’s Nest (2006), an anthology of poems from Queen’s University, Belfast. Professor Ormsby was editor of The Honest Ulsterman from 1969 to 1989, and has also edited Poetry Ireland Review. Until 2010, he was Head of English at the Royal Belfast Academical Institution. In 1992 he received the Cultural Traditions Award, given in memory of John Hewitt, and in 2002, the Lawrence O’Shaughnessy Award for Poetry.